Is it too ‘woo woo’ for you?


Have you ever come across something that you know has helped other people and yet to you it seems like it’s just too ‘out there’? That the very concept of it is just something you can’t wrap your head around? This is the story of Carl.

I’m sitting in a crowded eatery with Carl, a visionary entrepreneur I’ve been coaching for several years. He’s lean, light skinned with a dazzling white smile, brown hair, and eyes the colour of milk chocolate. Seated, across from each other, he hides his height unlike when we’re standing and he towers a foot above me.

We’re having one of our philosophical lunches with a side of entrepreneurship where we typically explore topics like neuroscience, personal development, human behaviour, and business. On this particular day, I’ve set an intention to listen for who among my team would be the best substitute coach to help Carl level UP whilst I’m overseas training for 5 weeks.

One of the reasons I established the Intrinsic Brilliance Institute was to enable exceptional mindset mastery facilitators to have a network to support each other so we can have time away to continue our self work and yet help our clients still maintain their momentum. This can be tricky because it’s a special bond we have with a coach.

We need to feel safe and unconditionally supported by our coach – fully trusting in their skill and ability to breakthrough our blockages and pave a pathway for us – igniting a better way of being. When this is done well, both client and coach leaves each interaction glowing – spirits soaring higher than when they greeted each other.

“She’s a bit too woo woo for me,” Carl confesses as I’m suggesting options for him. So I remind him, “It’s my job to make sure you’re challenged and yet still comfortable. I feel she can offer you that.”

Ava Leonard is a Body Talk practitioner. She shines a spotlight on unconscious belief systems through muscle testing, and she often offers sessions via phone using her body as the surrogate. Carl’s eyebrows crept up towards his forehead, revealing his scepticism before his mouth did. This was not something in his experience that he could feel comfortable with.

So, we discussed energy, and the quantum physics theory of non-locality that makes distance sessions possible before talking about the importance of practicing the scientific method – suspending disbelief and being open to experimenting by grounding this new idea in things he was already familiar with. And during that conversation, I remembered this article I wrote about extra sensory phenomena (ESP) and how two researchers with opposing hypotheses could both find what they believed in this collaborative study.

It’s like Henry Ford said, “Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.” The same premise applies to everything, so you’d better watch what you think and carefully examine what you believe to be true. If you believe you’re a super-being who can be/do/have anything you want, well, you’re right.

As you think about Carl’s story now, are there any experiences that you turned down because they seemed to ‘woo woo’? It’s a bit like a child who refuses to eat peas because he doesn’t like them, even though he hasn’t even tried it. Just because it’s not in your experience yet doesn’t mean that you won’t enjoy it. And perhaps like the child you’ll eat the peas and realise you really don’t like them. Or perhaps it will become a new favourite source of nourishment. You won’t know until you give it a go.

About divya

Consciousness explorer devoted to unveiling the intrinsic brilliance within all of us.